At the Apogee

All that remains is the outline. You can’t tell what it was like, it’s as lost to the past as the ruins of Angkor Wat.

Source: flickr.com via Kathleen on Pinterest

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Try to imagine going to a car dealer when the new models arrived. Filling out forms, getting the keys and driving out onto the street in a new American car. The Buicks in the early 1950s were just over 2 tons of steel and chrome with 180 horsepower and just about every option the manufacturer could think of. The government wasn’t mandating anything. No seatbelts, air bags, emission controls, computers, fuel efficiency limits. Just a car the way the company decided to build it to compete in the marketplace for consumer dollars. That’s how it was in Old America. They looked like this. 53Buick

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6 thoughts on “At the Apogee

  1. Back in the early eighties, stationed at SAC, NE, I used to hike down to the MO river, overlooking Council Bluffs, IA, for a cold one, and a smoke, after shift was over. The nice ledge I sat on, after a spring run off, revealed the bumper of a 57 Chevy, buried under around six feet of bank. Nice place.
    Now, in NM, there is a 49 Chevy flatbed dually half buried in an arroyo. Someone left some rosary beads there, now that is some respect.

  2. Purty! And in those days you could actually recognize a car blocks away, either visually or by the sound! Sigh…

  3. “All that remains is the outline. You can’t tell what it was like, it’s as lost to the past as the ruins of Angkor Wat.”

    Poetic, man.

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