Honor

What would you do if you bid on and won an old 1911 in an on-line auction and when you got the pistol, it had a name on it? A 1911 manufactured in 1914 with USMC markings and the name of a Medal of Honor recipient engraved in the slide?

This wasn’t a philosophical question for George Berry. He won the auction, got the pistol for less than a $1000. Then he researched the name and found out that the name on the slide, John J. McGinty, had earned the Medal of Honor in Vietnam in 1966, with that pistol in his hand. With that information, the value of the pistol went up considerably.

After more research, George Berry found out that John McGinty had retired from the Corps in 1976. He is still alive, living in South Carolina. George contacted him, wanting to hear the story of how John had come to part with the pistol. Turns out it was stolen.

So what does a man of honor like George Berry do? A man who had also served in the Marines and the Navy? He returns the pistol to John McGinty. Just gives it back after it had been missing for 30 years.

Honor. Some men have lots of it. George Berry is one of them.

Semper Fidelis.

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6 thoughts on “Honor

  1. Rare thing it is, this Honor you speak of.
    Back in the mid-60's my dad came home with a double barrel 10 ga.
    He'd carried his old Browning A1 in to have the problem with not fully ejecting the spent shell fixed. (A not uncommon problem with that model in those days)
    The gunsmith looked at his name on the ticket, disappeared into the back, and came back with a J&W Tolley from Birmingham, England circa 1867 that had belonged to his grandfather, who'd propped it up against the barn while chasing the Jersey Bull in to service one of the dairy cows. The bull proceeded to run all over the shotgun and break off both the rabbit head hammers. He took it in to have them brazed back on.

    He died in 1949, just before I was born.

    “No charge” the gunsmith told my dad, “sorry about your grand dad”.

    I still have that gun………one day it will go to my grandson.

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