Jeremiah Workman, Sgt. USMC

When Borepatch came to visit, he brought me a book. This isn’t a fun read. It isn’t an easy book or a lighthearted topic. It’s the story of a United States Marine that has an afternoon in hell, loses three of his squadmates, and has his life altered by PTSD.

It’s also a story of continuing his fight. He’s not whining, or sugar coating anything. He’s fighting for his life, to love his wife and son, to live with PTSD and not be destroyed by it, to honor his friends, his Corps, and his Country with what he does with his life.

The Corps thought enough of his actions that day to award him the Navy Cross. I think he might have deserved the Medal of Honor. He thinks he didn’t do enough.

The lesson of this book, and of the combat experience of millions of servicemen, is that everyone is vulnerable to the stress of combat. Every man we send will be changed by his experience, many will be badly injured even when they show no scars.
If you’re interested, it’s available from Amazon at this link.

Semper Fidelis, Marine.

Freedom is not free, but the U.S. Marine Corps will pay most of your share.
–Ned Dolan

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6 thoughts on “Jeremiah Workman, Sgt. USMC

  1. Back a few decades ago, there was a group of “been there, done that” vets that helped other vets deal. It was all volunteers. You had to have “teeth marks on your CIB” to qualify. Great group, I hope they're still around. Our kids & grandkids need something like that now.
    YeOldFurt

  2. Wow. Added to my reading list.

    Now for something of a diatribe regarding the MoH / Navy Cross debate for this gallant young man:

    The Corps does not award the MoH lightly. IIRC, when viewed on a service by service basis, The Corps has fewer MoH winners than any of the other branches. But when The Corps does award the MoH, they do it full tilt. Again, IIRC, of all the WW2 Marine Corps MoH's awarded, something like 1/3 were given for actions on Iwo Jima. Four years of fighting, and fully one third were awarded in only a 34 DAY period. When Adm. Chester Nimitz opined “uncommon valor was a common virtue” about the Marines fighting on Iwo, he wasn't kidding. Damned fine, brave men, each and every one of them.

    – Brad

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